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Trump floats delaying November election

President Trump suggested delaying November's election in a Thursday tweet, again claiming without evidence that mail-in voting will lead to widespread voter fraud.

The state of play: While this is the first time that Trump has actively floated changing Election Day, he does not have the power to do so. That lies exclusively with Congress, per a Washington Post breakdown of the issue.


  • The National Constitution Center also has done a deep dive on the subject, which found that many states have the power to delay general election voting due to an emergency — though postponing a presidential election would be completely unprecedented.

What he's saying: "With Universal Mail-In Voting (not Absentee Voting, which is good), 2020 will be the most INACCURATE & FRAUDULENT Election in history. It will be a great embarrassment to the USA. Delay the Election until people can properly, securely and safely vote???" Trump tweeted.

Flashback: Trump called suggestions by Joe Biden that he was considering changing the date of the election "made-up propaganda" during an April press briefing.

  • "I never even thought of changing the date of the election.  Why would I do that?  November 3rd.  It’s a good number.  No, I look forward to that election."

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Reproduced from Indeed; Chart: Axios Visuals

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