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Trump contradicts CDC chief on when vaccine will be widely available

President Trump claimed at a press briefing on Wednesday that CDC director Robert Redfield was wrong when he testified to Congress that a coronavirus vaccine won't be available for widespread distribution until the second or third quarter of 2021.

Why it matters: Trump has already faced criticism for allegations that his administration has politicized the coronavirus response and is seeking rapid approval and distribution of a vaccine in order to boost his re-election campaign. His contradiction of Redfield, who the president said was probably "confused," may further erode public trust.


The big picture: A vaccine has not been submitted for the FDA to review, and even that may not happen by Trump's aggressive October estimate for distribution. Whenever a vaccine is approved, it will take several more months to manufacture enough of it to even begin vaccinating the general public.

  • Redfield testified on Wednesday that a vaccine could be available for first responders and vulnerable populations by November or December, but that it will take six to nine months before it can be distributed nationally.
  • The chief scientific adviser to Operation Warp Speed, the project tasked with developing a vaccine by January, has also said it is "extremely unlikely" that widespread distribution will be possible by October or November.

What they're saying: "I think he made a mistake when he said that. It's just incorrect information. I called him and he didn't tell me that. I think he got the message  maybe confused, maybe it was stated incorrectly," Trump said.

  • "No, we are ready to go. It could be announced in October or a little after that. Once we go, we are ready."
  • Asked about his timeline for distribution to the general public, Trump responded: "Immediately. When we go we go. We are not looking to say, gee in six months we're going to start giving it to the general public."
  • "It was an incorrect statement. I saw the statement and I called him and said what do you mean by that? And I think he just made a mistake. I think he misunderstood the question, probably."

Go deeper ... Biden: "I trust vaccines, I trust scientists, but I don’t trust Donald Trump"

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