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Kayleigh McEnany: Trump will accept "free and fair" election, no answer on if he loses

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Thursday that President Trump will "accept the results of a free and fair election," but did not specify whether he will commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he loses to Joe Biden.

Why it matters: Trump refused to say on Wednesday whether he would commit to a peaceful transition of power, instead remarking: "we're going to have to see what happens."


The big picture: Trump told reporters on Wednesday he believes the Supreme Court may have to decide the results of the 2020 presidential election, as he has ramped up continued claims that mail-in voting will result in widespread voter fraud.

  • FBI Director Christopher Wray testified to the Senate Homeland Security Committee on Thursday that the agency has "not seen, historically, any kind of coordinated national voter fraud effort in a major election, whether it's by mail or otherwise."

What she's saying:

REPORTER: "...are the results legitimate only if the president wins?"
MCENANY: "The president will accept the results of a free and fair election. He will accept the will of the American people."
REPORTER: "So for clarity, if he loses, and it's free and fair, he will accept them?"
MCENANY: "I've answered your question. He will accept the results of a free and fair election."

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Why the startup world needs to ditch "unicorns" for "dragons"

When Aileen Lee originally coined the term "unicorn" in late 2013, she was describing the 39 "U.S.-based software companies started since 2003 and valued at over $1 billion by public or private market investors."

Flashback: It got redefined in early 2015 by yours truly and Erin Griffith, in a cover story for Fortune, as any privately-held startup valued at $1 billion or more. At the time, we counted 80 of them.

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Why it matters: The changes could reduce traffic to some news publishers, particularly companies that post a lot of political content.

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