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World coronavirus updates: Cases top 20 million

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

The number of COVID-19 cases surpassed 20 million on Monday evening, Johns Hopkins data shows.

By the numbers: Over 733,100 people have died of the novel coronavirus globally, per Johns Hopkins. More than 12.2 million have recovered from the virus.


  • Brazil has the world's second-highest number of deaths from COVID-19 (over 101,700) and infections (more than 3 million) after the U.S., which has reported 163,300 deaths and over 5 million cases.

What's happening:

  • Australian officials in Victoria announced on Tuesday morning local time another 331 new cases and that COVID-19 had killed 19 more people — equaling the state and national death toll record set the previous day. Australia was on track to suppress the virus in May, but cases have been spiking in Victoria in recent weeks.
  • Finland announced Mondaythat travelersfrom coronavirus "risk countries" must self-isolate for 14 days "or risk a fine or up to three months' imprisonment," the Guardian reports. Finland has listed 25 countries as safe from COVID-19, "including Ireland, Japan, Greece, Cyprus and Uruguay," the outlet notes.
  • The European Centre of Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) warned on Monday that the continent is seeing a "true resurgence" in coronavirus cases and recommended that affected countries consider reimposing certain restrictions.
  • New Zealand has now gone 100 days with no detected community spread of COVID-19, the Ministry of Health confirmed on Sunday. It comes as Kiwis prepare to go to the polls on Sept. 19 for what Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is calling the "Covid election."
  • Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro posted a photo of himself to Facebook congratulating his soccer team for winning the state title Saturday, after the health ministry confirmed the national COVID-19 death toll had surpassed 100,000.

Between the lines: Policy responsesto the crisis have been every-country-for-itself and — in the case of the U.S. and China — tinged with geopolitical rivalry. But the scientific work to understand the virus and develop a vaccine has been globalized on an unprecedented scale.

Coronavirus symptoms include: Fever, cough, shortness of breath, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headaches, sore throat and a loss of taste or smell.

Editors note: The graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14. This article has been updated with new details throughout. Check back for the latest. 

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