Show an ad over header. AMP

"Unconstitutional slop": Republicans and Dems react to Trump's coronavirus aid action

Some Republicans joined Democrats in criticizing President Trump Saturday night for taking executive action on coronavirus aid, with Democratic leaders demanding the GOP return to negotiations after stimulus package talks broke down a day earlier.

Why it matters: Trump could face legal challenges on his ability to act without congressional approval, where the power lies on federal spending. Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) was the most vocal Republican critic, saying in a statement: "The pen-and-phone theory of executive lawmaking is unconstitutional slop."


Instead of putting in the work to solve Americans’ problems, Pres. Trump chose to stay on his golf course to announce unworkable, weak & narrow policy announcements to slash the unemployment benefits that millions desperately need and endanger seniors’ Social Security & Medicare pic.twitter.com/QNwu3HEcbi

— Chuck Schumer (@SenSchumer) August 9, 2020

What else they're saying: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) issued a joint statement on Saturday evening accusing Trump of failing to comprehend "the seriousness or the urgency of the health and economic crises facing working families."

  • Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, accused Trump of putting Social Security at risk with what he described as "a series of half-baked measures." Biden said in an emailed statement that Trump's payroll tax plan — which the president said would help "greatly," with payroll taxes for Americans earning less than $100,000 a year — had "no protections or guarantees," unlike those in the Obama administration.
  • Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) tweeted, "The president is doing all he can to help workers, students and renters, but Congress is the one who should be acting. Democrats should stop blocking common sense proposals to help students going back to school & college & parents going back to work who need child care."
  • Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), a Trump ally, tweeted, "I appreciate the President taking this decisive action but would much prefer a congressional agreement. I believe President Trump would prefer the same."
  • Rep. Justin Amash (L-Mich.), a vocal Trump critic who left the Republican Party in 2019, tweeted, "Our Constitution doesn’t authorize the president to act as king whenever Congress doesn’t legislate."

What he's saying: Trump conceded that Democrats might legally challenge his actions, but he said: "Through these four actions, my administration will provide immediate and vital relief to Americans struggling in this difficult time."

  • In a Saturday night tweet, Trump attacked Biden's plan to raise $3.2 trillion over a decade from tax increases in order to pay for his climate and health care proposals, saying: "Sleepy Joe Biden just agreed with the Radical Left Democrats to raise Taxes by Three Trillion Dollars. Everyone will pay - Will kill your Stocks, 401k’s, and the ECONOMY. BIG CRASH!"

Of note: The order and memoranda signed by Trump would dd $400 per week in extra unemployment benefits through the end of 2020, requiring states to cover 25% of the additional benefits.

  • Previous enhanced unemployment benefits related to COVID-19 added $600 a week to standard state unemployment.

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

Trump pushes to expand ban against anti-racism training to federal contractors

President Trump announced late Tuesday that the White House attempt to halt federal agencies' anti-racism training would be expanded to block federal contractors from "promoting radical ideologies that divide Americans by race or sex."

Why it matters: The executive order appears to give the government the ability to cancel contracts if anti-racist or diversity trainings focused on sexual identity or gender are organized. The memo applies to executive departments and agencies, the U.S. military, federal contractors and federal grant recipients.

Keep reading... Show less

GoodRx prices IPO at $33 per share, valued at $12.7 billion

GoodRx, a price comparison app for prescription drugs at local pharmacies, on Tuesday raised $1.14 billion in its IPO, Axios has learned.

By the numbers: GoodRx priced its shares at $33 a piece, above its $24-$28 per share offering range, which will give it an initial market cap of around $12.7 billion.

Keep reading... Show less

Scoop: Meadows puts agencies on notice about staff shake-up

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows told administration officials Monday to expect senior aides to be replaced at many government agencies, according to an internal email obtained by Axios.

Behind the scenes: Meadows asked the director of the White House Presidential Personnel Office John McEntee "to look at replacing the White House Liaisons (WHLs) at many of your agencies," according to the email. "John will be working with outgoing liaisons to explore other opportunities."

Keep reading... Show less

White House ricin package suspect allegedly urged Trump to "give up for this election"

A Canadian woman allegedly mailed a letter addressed to President Trump containing the poison ricin and the threat "give up and remove your application for this election," court papers filed Tuesday show.

Driving the news: Pascale Cecile Veronique Ferrier, 53, was arrested trying to enter New York from Canada on Sunday. She appeared briefly in a Buffalo, N.Y., courtroom where a judge entered a not guilty plea on her behalf to the charge of threatening the president, per CBC.

Keep reading... Show less

House Democrats, Trump administration strike deal to avert government shutdown

House Democrats have reached a deal with the Trump administration on legislation to fund the government through Dec. 11, Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) announced Tuesday.

Why it matters: The deal will avert a government shutdown when funding expires in eight days. Pelosi and House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) said earlier that they hoped to hold a vote on the legislation on Tuesday evening.

Keep reading... Show less

Remote work won't kill your office

We can officially declare the 9-to-5, five-days-a-week, in-office way of working dead. But offices themselves aren't dead. And neither are cities.

The big picture: Since the onset of pandemic-induced telework, companies have oscillated between can't-wait-to-go-back and work-from-home-forever. Now, it's becoming increasingly clear that the future of work will land somewhere in the middle — a remote/in-person hybrid.

Keep reading... Show less

FBI: Foreign actors likely to sow disinformation about delays in election results

The FBI and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency released a public service announcement on Tuesday warning that mail-in ballots "could leave officials with incomplete results on election night," and that foreign actors are likely to spread disinformation about the delays.

The bottom line: The agencies called on the public to "critically evaluate the sources of the information they consume and to seek out reliable and verified information from trusted sources," including state and local election officials.

Keep reading... Show less

The big business of immigrant detention

Around 70% of all immigration detention centers are run by private companies, including the one at the heart of a new whistleblower complaint that alleges systemic medical neglect and malpractice.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the business of immigrant detention, including oversight and profit incentives, with Jonathan Blitzer, a staff writer for the New Yorker who’s covered the subject for years.

Insights

mail-copy

Get Goodhumans in your inbox

Most Read

More Stories