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Senate to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation to Supreme Court on Oct. 26

The Senate will vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court next Monday, Oct. 26, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) announced Tuesday.

The big picture: The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote this Thursday to advance Barrett's nomination to the full Senate floor. Democrats have acknowledged that there's nothing procedurally that they can do to stop Barrett's confirmation, which will take place just one week out from Election Day.


Driving the news: The Supreme Court's 4-4 deadlock on a request from Pennsylvania's Republican Party to shorten the deadlines for mail-in ballots underscores the importance for conservatives of confirming Barrett before the election. President Trump himself has said Barrett could be a deciding vote in an election-related dispute.

What to watch: Joe Biden said at an ABC town hall last week that he will come out with a clear position on court packing by Nov. 3, but his answer will depend on how the Barrett's confirmation is "handled."

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Why the startup world needs to ditch "unicorns" for "dragons"

When Aileen Lee originally coined the term "unicorn" in late 2013, she was describing the 39 "U.S.-based software companies started since 2003 and valued at over $1 billion by public or private market investors."

Flashback: It got redefined in early 2015 by yours truly and Erin Griffith, in a cover story for Fortune, as any privately-held startup valued at $1 billion or more. At the time, we counted 80 of them.

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Scoop: Facebook's new moves to lower News Feed's political volume

Facebook plans to announce that it will de-emphasize political posts and current events content in the News Feed based on negative user feedback, Axios has learned. It also plans to expand tests to limit the amount of political content that people see in their News Feeds to more countries outside of the U.S.

Why it matters: The changes could reduce traffic to some news publishers, particularly companies that post a lot of political content.

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