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Mother of late Capitol Police officer pressures GOP senators on Jan. 6 commission

The mother of the late Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, who suffered two strokes and died the day after responding to rioters on Jan. 6, is requesting sit-downs with Republican senators this week to push for an investigation into the Capitol attack, Politico reports.

Why it matters: Republicans are set to filibuster the proposal to create a bipartisan Jan. 6 commission when Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) brings it for a vote this week, despite some GOP support in the House and initial bipartisan agreement that an investigation is needed.


  • The bill to form the commission was crafted by Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) and Rep. John Katko (R-N.Y.), the top Democrat and Republican on the House Homeland Security Committee, but has been rejected as too "political" by GOP leadership.
  • At least 10 Senate Republicans are needed to overcome a 60-vote filibuster and move to a final vote. Sens. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) are the only two GOP senators to express public support for the bill so far.

What she's saying: “Not having a January 6 Commission to look into exactly what occurred is a slap in the faces of all the officers who did their jobs that day,” Gladys Sicknick said in a statement provided to Politico.

  • “I suggest that all Congressmen and Senators who are against this Bill visit my son’s grave in Arlington National Cemetery and, while there, think about what their hurtful decisions will do to those officers who will be there for them going forward."
  • “Putting politics aside, wouldn’t they want to know the truth of what happened on January 6? If not, they do not deserve to have the jobs they were elected to do,” she said.

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