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In photos: Maskless Trump supporters descend on D.C. to protest the election results

Thousands of protesters, including many not wearing face masks despite a citywide mandate, rallied in Washington, D.C., Saturday, refusing to accept President Trump lost the 2020 election.

Driving the news: Thirty-nine days after the election, Trump continues to make baseless claims of voter fraud and refuses to concede to President-elect Joe Biden. The Supreme Court on Friday handed Trump and his allies their most significant legal defeat, rejecting a lawsuit that sought to invalidate 10 million votes in four battleground states.


  • Saturday's protest also comes just days before Electoral College meets to vote for president and vice president. Biden is expected to have 306 electoral votes to Trump's 232 votes. A candidate needs 270 to win.

The state of play: Waving Trump flags and chanting "four more years," groups are rallying and marching at different spots around the nation's capital to show their support for Trump.

  • The president tweeted Saturday morning: "Wow! Thousands of people forming in Washington (D.C.) for Stop the Steal. Didn’t know about this, but I’ll be seeing them! #MAGA."
  • He later flew on Marine One over the protests as he headed to the Army-Navy football game at West Point.
  • Counter-protesters are also gathering.
  • At least five people were arrested Friday night into Saturday morning, D.C. police said. Local media reported that some fights between Trump supporters and counter-protesters broke out.
  • A similar protest took place in D.C. last month.
Thousands flock to the nation's capital to show their support for President Trump. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images.
Former national security advisor Michael Flynn delivers his first public remarks since Trump pardoned him in late November. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images
Trump supporters hold a prayer vigil Saturday morning outside the Supreme Court. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
Members of the Proud Boys, a far-right group with ties to white nationalism, march in support of Trump. Photo: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images
Many protesters did not adhere to a city-wide mask mandate, prompting concerns from D.C. residents. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images
Trump supporters rally in front of the U.S. Capitol. Photo: Oliver Douliery/AFP via Getty Images
Protesters gather on the National Mall to support Trump. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images
A protester wears a Trump mask as thousands gather to protest the election results. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
Saturday's protest comes 39 days after the election. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

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