Show an ad over header. AMP

The coronavirus-connected heart ailment that could lead to sudden death in athletes

Cardiologists are increasingly concerned that coronavirus infections could cause heart complications that lead to sudden cardiac death in athletes.

Why it matters: Even if just a tiny percentage of COVID-19 cases lead to major cardiac conditions, the sheer scope of the pandemic raises the risk for those who regularly conduct the toughest physical activity — including amateurs who might be less aware of the danger.


Driving the news: Both the Big 10 and Pac-12 conferences announced this week that they wouldn't play college football in the fall because of health concerns about the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • According to ESPN, a major factor driving those decisions has been fear that COVID-19 could lead to a rise in myocarditis among athletes.

Myocarditis is an inflammation of the heart caused by viral infections that can lead to rapid or abnormal heart rhythms and even sudden cardiac death.

  • Myocarditis causes about 75 deaths per year in young athletes between the ages of 13 and 25, often without any warning. The 27-year-0lld Boston Celtics star Reggie Lewis collapsed at a practice and soon died from myocarditis in 1993.
  • While research is still in its infancy, a July study of 100 adult patients in Germany had recovered from COVID-19 found that 60% had findings of ongoing myocardial inflammation.
  • Worryingly, patients with mild COVID-19 symptoms developed myocarditis as frequently as those who were hospitalized, raising the possibility that those who may not even know they have COVID-19 could be at risk.
  • That's important because athletes with myocarditis must cease intense physical activity for weeks or even months until the conditions clears up. Otherwise, says Emory University sports cardiologist Jonathan Kim, they put themselves in danger of "cardiac arrest and a catastrophic outcome."

By the numbers: NCAA chief medical officer Brian Hainline said in a press call Thursday that at least a dozen college athletes so far had been found to have myocarditis after testing positive for COVID-19.

College athletes and to a greater extent professional ones have the benefit of more frequent COVID-19 tests and oversight from doctors who know to look out for signs of myocarditis.

  • But amateur athletes may be largely on their own, even though they too would be at risk from myocarditis and sudden death should they continue to engage in vigorous exercise after a COVID-19 infection.
  • "For your high-end marathoners and triathletes, [myocarditis] is a reasonable consideration," says Kim. "It's something to discuss with your doctor or consult with a sports cardiologist before you get back to training."
  • Yes, but: Those of us who exercise to stay healthy but have no intention of entering the Ironman Triathlon likely don't have much to worry about.

The bottom line: The more we learn about COVID-19, the more varied the threat it poses becomes. But little seems scarier then the possibility of sudden cardiac death in the fittest among us.

How the Oracle-TikTok deal would work

An agreement between TikTok's Chinese owner ByteDance and Oracle includes a variety of concessions in an effort to make the deal palatable to the Trump administration and security hawks in Congress, according to a source close to the companies.

The big picture: The deal, in the form of a 20-page term sheet agreed to in principle by the companies, would give Oracle unprecedented access and control over user data as well as other measures designed to ensure that Americans' data is protected, according to the source.

Keep reading... Show less

The European Union may soon get its own Magnitsky Act to target human rights abusers

Amid a global assaulton human rights stretching from Belarus to Hong Kong to Yemen, the European Union signaled yesterday that it may act to deter corrupt kleptocrats and state abusers by hitting them where it hurts: their assets.

Driving the news: Europe's chief executive Ursula von der Leyen revealed in her first-ever State of the Union speech that she will bring forth a European Magnitsky Act, a sanctions framework modeled after a U.S. law that restricts malign actors' access to travel and the global financial system.

Keep reading... Show less

Cancer death rates are dropping but Black Americans still face highest risk

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios 

There's some good news in 2020: Cancer death rates have been falling overall, and the gap between racial and ethnic groups has been narrowing.

Yes, but: Decades of systemic racism and the structures developed under it continue to limit the ability of Americans to benefit equally from cancer advances, some medical experts tell Axios, as seen by Black Americans who've had the highest death rate from cancer for 40 years. And the pandemic is expected to exacerbate the problem further.

Keep reading... Show less

WHO: Health care workers account for around 14% of coronavirus cases

Though health workers represent less than 3% of the population in many countries, they account for around 14% coronavirus cases reported to the World Health Organization, the organization announced Thursday.

Why it matters: The WHO called on governments and health care leaders to address threats facing the health and safety of these workers, adding that the pandemic has highlighted how protecting them is needed to ensure a functioning health care system.

Keep reading... Show less

Trump says he will sign executive order on "patriotic education" in rebuke of 1619 project

President Trump said he would sign an executive order on Thursday to "promote patriotic education" through an effort called the 1776 Commission, while denouncing a New York Times' project that investigated the impacts of racial injustice for Black Americans.

The big picture: The 1619 project dug into the personal histories of Black Americans in the U.S. who have faced present-day systematic inequality in housing and farming, as well as how the legacy of slavery altered health care access for Black Americans and fueled the country's early economy.

Keep reading... Show less

Podcast: Amazon exec on the company's Climate Pledge Fund

Amazon on Thursday announced the first companies to receive money from a $2 billion venture capital fund it formed to help combat climate change.

Axios Re:Cap digs into how Amazon hopes the fund will help achieve its goal of being carbon neutral by 2040, and whether the plan is more substance than spin, with Matt Peterson, Amazon's director of new initiatives and corporate development.

Air quality in American West among the worst in the world

The air quality in Portland has become the worst in the world — with Seattle, Los Angeles and Denver also ranking up there with notoriously polluted places like Delhi and Shanghai.

Why it matters: Big-city residents often consider themselves smugly immune to the physical wreckage of calamities like wildfires, floods and hurricanes. The pernicious smoke now blanketing the splendid cities of our nation's Western spine is a reminder that no one is exempt from climate change.

Keep reading... Show less

FBI director confirms "very, very active" Russian efforts to interfere in election

FBI Director Chris Wray on Thursday told Congress the bureau has seen "very active efforts by the Russians to influence our elections in 2020," primarily to "denigrate Vice President Biden and what the Russians see as kind of an anti-Russian establishment."

Why it matters: It confirms previous previous statements from various intelligence officials about Russia's interference activities, which continue with less than 50 days until the election.

Keep reading... Show less

Insights

mail-copy

Get Goodhumans in your inbox

Most Read

More Stories