Show an ad over header. AMP

Democrats are destroying Republicans in a historic "green tsunami" of fundraising

The most shocking pre-electionresult neither side can dispute is in: Democrats are destroying Republicans in truly historic ways in fundraising. 

Why it matters: Money can’t buy elections, but it sure helps. And Joe Biden and a half dozen Senate Democratic candidates are bathing in cash, often with 2x or 3x advantages over their opponents. 


  • A top Republican insider told me: "Fundraising is a barometer of voter support and intensity. Pretty clear from these numbers who has more support and enthusiasm."

Let’s go to the tape: 

  • On the air, President Trump is being "vastly outspent" by Biden, who has maintained a nearly 2-to-1 advantage for months, the N.Y. Times reports on today's front page.
  • Joe Biden and the DNC raised $383 million in September, compared to $248 million for Trump and the RNC. Biden's campaign had $432 million in cash on hand, to $251 million for Trump's campaign and joint committees.
  • In the top 14 Senate races, Democrats more than doubled Republicans' fundraising haul, according to a Politico tally — $363 million to $143 million, for the quarter ending Sept. 30.
  • Democratic challengers are raking in so much money that seven of the 10 most expensive Senate races ever are happening now, CNN reported from Advertising Analytics data.

Some marquee destinations for Senate cash:

  • In South Carolina, Democrat Jaime Harrison, challenging Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham, shattered Senate fundraising records with a $57 million haul for Q3. Graham raised half that — $28 million, which itself was a record for Senate Republicans.
  • Also doubling up his opponent is Montana Gov. Steve Bullock (D), who's challenging Sen. Steve Daines. Bullock set a record for the most ever raised in a quarter for a Montana U.S. Senate race ($27 million to Daines' $12 million) — beating his own record for the previous quarter, Lee Newspapers reported.
  • In Iowa, Democratic challenger Theresa Greenfield raised more money in Q3 than any previous Iowa Senate candidate in an entire election cycle, according to Iowa Starting Line. She out-raised Sen. Joni Ernst 4-to-1, according to the Center for Responsive Politics ($29 million to $7 million).
  • Democratic challengers also raised eye-popping amounts for longshot Senate races in Kentucky, Texas and Mississippi.

Money is also trickling down to once unthinkable Senate races — including Kansas and Alaska — forcing Republican outside groups to spend money playing defense, AP reports from Kantar/CMAG data.

Biden's climate orders to include halt on new oil-and-gas leases on public lands

President Biden will signnew executive actions today that provide the clearest signs yet of his climate plans — and will begin an intense battle with the oil industry.

Driving the news: One move will freeze issuance of new oil-and-gas leases on public lands and waters "to the extent possible," per a White House summary.

Keep reading... Show less

Silicon Valley backlash grows as vocal tech faction boycotts

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Keep reading... Show less

Telework's tax mess: A permanent side effect of the pandemic

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Keep reading... Show less

The search for the next generation of newsroom leaders.

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.

Keep reading... Show less

Young people want checks on Big Tech's power

Data: Generation Lab; Chart: Sara Wise/Axios

The next generation of college-educated Americans thinks social media companies have too much power and influence on politics and need more government regulation, according to a new survey by Generation Lab for Axios.

Why it matters: The findings follow an election dominated by rampant disinformation about voting fraud on social media; companies' fraught efforts to stifle purveyors of disinformation including former President Trump; and a deadly Jan. 6 insurrection over the election organized largely online.

Keep reading... Show less

Insights

mail-copy

Get Goodhumans in your inbox

Most Read

More Stories