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CDC director suggests face masks offer more COVID-19 protection than vaccine could

CDC director Robert Redfield suggested in a Senate Appropriations subcommittee hearing on Wednesday that face masks are "more guaranteed" to protect against the coronavirus than a vaccine, citing the potential for some people to not become immune to the virus after receiving the shot.

What he's saying: "These face masks are the most important, powerful public health tool we have. And I will continue to appeal for all Americans, all individuals in our country, to embrace these face coverings. I've said if we did it for 6, 8, 10, 12 weeks, we'd bring this pandemic under control," he said.


  • "I might even go so far as to say that this face mask is more guaranteed to protect me against COVID than when I take a COVID vaccine. Because the immunogenicity may be 70%, and if I don't get an immune response, the vaccine's not going to protect me. This face mask will."

The big picture: While face masks are one of the best COVID-19 mitigation strategies we currently have, a vaccine remains the best long-term solution. A number of coronavirus vaccines are now in phase 3 trials, including candidates from Oxford and Moderna that produced immune responses in tests this summer.

  • Wearing face masks "could result in a large reduction in risk of infection," according to a June review of 172 studies looking at the effectiveness of masks in reducing the spread of SARS-CoV-2 and other coronaviruses.
  • Mask mandates in 15 states plus D.C. early in the pandemic may have helped to avert at least 230,000 coronavirus cases by May 22, according to a study published in Health Affairs.

What to watch: Redfield told the subcommittee that he believes there will be a "very limited supply" of a vaccine between November and December, and that "we're probably looking at late second quarter, third quarter of 2021" for widespread distribution.

  • That's in line with comments from NIAID director Anthony Fauci, who has said he believes a coronavirus vaccine will be widely available to the public by late 2020 or early 2021 — allowing the U.S. and other countries to get back to "a degree of normality."

Netanyahu doesn't want a fight with Biden over Iran — yet

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, hoping to avoid an immediate clash with President Biden over Iran, will give dialogue a chance, Israeli officials say.

Why it matters: Biden intends to try to resume the 2015 nuclear deal, which Netanyahu vehemently opposes. The two are on a collision course, and memories are fresh of the crisis in U.S.-Israel relations when Netanyahu was publicly campaigning against Barack Obama's attempts to reach a deal — including in a speech to Congress.

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The Doomsday Clock is kept unchanged at 100 seconds to midnight

In its annual update on Wednesday morning, scientists announced the Doomsday Clock would be kept at 100 seconds to midnight.

Why it matters: The decision to keep the clock hands steady — tied for the closest it has ever been to midnight in the clock's 74-year history — reflects a picture of progress on climate change and politics undercut by growing threats from infectious disease and disruptive technologies.

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Biden's climate orders to include halt on new oil-and-gas leases on public lands

President Biden will signnew executive actions today that provide the clearest signs yet of his climate plans — and will begin an intense battle with the oil industry.

Driving the news: One move will freeze issuance of new oil-and-gas leases on public lands and waters "to the extent possible," per a White House summary.

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Silicon Valley backlash grows as vocal tech faction boycotts

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

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Telework's tax mess: A permanent side effect of the pandemic

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

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