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6 people charged in plot to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer

Six people have been charged in an alleged plot to violently overthrow the government and kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, according to an FBI affidavit unsealed Thursday.

Why it matters: Whitmer has been heavily criticized by some right-wing groups for implementing strict coronavirus restrictions. In April, hundreds of protesters, including armed members of local militias, stormed the Michigan Capitol in protest of Whitmer's stay-at-home order.


  • Violence by militia groups has become a growing concern in the past months.
  • The details of the alleged plot revealed on Thursday shed more light on how people with extremist ideologies are organizing themselves.

Driving the news: The FBI started tracking the conspiracy in early 2020 through social media channels through which individuals were plotting the violent overthrow state governments and law enforcement. The FBI had an inside source at a meeting held in June.

  • “The group talked about creating a society that followed the U.S. Bill of Rights and where they could be self-sufficient,” the source stated. “They discussed different ways of achieving this goal from peaceful endeavors to violent actions.
  • "At one point, several members talked about state governments they believed were violating the U.S. Constitution, including the government of Michigan and Governor Gretchen Whitmer." Members of the group reached out to a Michigan-based militia group as part of a recruitment effort.
  • The FBI was already tracking the militia in March because members were trying to acquire the addresses of local law enforcement officers, the FBI agent wrote.

The state of play: In recent weeks, the Michigan governor's residence received security upgrades, including a new perimeter fence.

  • "As a matter of practice, we’re constantly reviewing security protocols and adjusting as needed," said Shanon Banner, spokeswoman for the Michigan State Police.
  • "We don’t comment on specific threats against the governor nor do we provide information about security measures."

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

Read the criminal complaint.

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